Taxes


The Winter SnowForeign Investment in Real Property Tax Act (FIRPTA) is a unique tax. It requires the buyer, that’s right, the buyer to withhold from a foreign seller and pay to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) a tax on a percentage (formerly 10%) of the amount realized (sales price) upon the sale of any U.S. real property.

FIRPTA changed in December, 2015 for those closings on or after 2/17/16. There are some exceptions to the rule and an increase of the tax to 15%.

 

 

  1. If the sales price is $300,000.00 or less, the buyer intends to occupy the subject property and executes a certification of the facts (Buyers Affidavit of Residency, Intent and Price), the withholding rate is 0%.  This exception remains unchanged and was reconfirmed by the PATH Act.
  2.  If the sales price exceeds $300,000.00 but does not exceed $1,000,000.00, the buyer intends to occupy the subject property, and executes a certification of the facts (Buyers Affidavit of Residency, Intent and Price), the withholding rate is 10%.  This exception was newly created.

For all other transactions the withholding rate is 15% unless the foreign seller has obtained from the IRS a written Determination of Reduced or Waived Withholding.

Questions? 702 245 1787. Darren

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Short Sale Tax Issues 2014Tax Exclusion on Short Sales, extended to end of 2014. As in two weeks!

My original post on this matter is here: Income Taxes & Foreclosures/Shortsales 12.21.2007.

See also January 2013’s, Income Taxes & Foreclosure/Short Sales 2013 Update

As you know the tax code had an “Exclusion from gross income of discharge of qualified principal residence indebtedness (Sec. 108)”

…in other words many home owners were not taxed for 1099C income received as a result of foreclosure/short sale.  This exclusion expired 12.31.2103, well, it has been reinstated and extended to 12.31.2014. Good news for the short sale market.

UPDATE 12.24.2014 – Many questions as to when a real estate transaction must close. It must close in the year of 2014 to take advantage of this tax break.   But see these other posts from the I.R.S. which are helpful for non-owner occupied short sale/foreclosure tax concerns.

Ten Facts about Mortgage Debt Forgiveness

IRS publication on how 1099 taxes are calculated, exempt, etc.

IRS explanation as to taxes resulting from Foreclosure and Debt Cancellation.

OTHER SHORT SALE POSTS

7 Tips for Short Sale

Addendum to Short Sale Listing 1.26.2010

Advance Fees Continued and the FTC 1.6.2011

Advance Fees – Short Sales – FTC II 5.4.2011

Charging for negotiating short sales/Negotiators 10.1.2010

Deficiency Judgments Nevada 4.27.2007

Foreclosure and the One Action Rule in Nevada 4.10.2007

HAMP the Federal Shortsale Program coming April 2010

Income Taxes & Foreclosures/Shortsales 12.21.2007

IRS PUBLICATIONS shortsales/foreclosures:

Ten Facts about Mortgage Debt Forgiveness

IRS publication on how 1099 taxes are calculated, exempt, etc.

IRS explanation as to taxes resulting from Foreclosure and Debt Cancellation.

Judicial Foreclosures (Short sales are looking more attractive..) 3.23.2012

Lender Short Sale Approval Addendum

Nevada Home Owner’s Bill of Rights (Foreclosure/Short Sale/Judicial Foreclosure)

Nevada Supreme Court Mandatory Mediation Program and How it Affects Shortsale

Nevada Short Sale Documents

Seller Being Released From Liability Language in Shortsale

Seller Liability After Short Sale 4.20.2007

Short Sale Advanced Fees

Short Sale Addendum to Purchase Agreement October 2010

Short Sales and Bankruptcy and Waiting Periods 10.5.2012

Short Sale – “Dual Tracking” and the Homeowner’s Bill of Rights in Nevada May 2013

Short Sale Junior Lien/Senior Liens Rights To Sue & Other Changes

Short Sale Wallet Size Answer Sheet

Questions? email me darren@dwelshlaw.com

Happy 4th of July

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The US Supreme Court upheld the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010.

Q:        Does the new health care law impose a 3.8 percent tax on profits from selling your home?

A:         No, with very few exceptions. The first $250,000 in profit from the sale of a personal residence won’t be taxed, or the first $500,000 in the case of a married couple. The tax falls on relatively few — those with high incomes from other sources.

Please read a very detailed analysis by clicking here, as written by FactCheck.org a nonpartisan, nonprofit “consumer advocate” for voters.

FactCheck.org explains:

The sort of people who would have to pay the tax might include, for example:

  • A single executive making $210,000 a year who sells his $300,000 ski condo for a $50,000 profit. His tax on the sale of that vacation home would amount to $1,900, in addition to the capital gains tax he would have paid anyway.
  • An “empty nester” couple with combined income of over $250,000 a year who sell their $1 million primary residence to move to smaller quarters. If they cleared $600,000 on the sale, they would be taxed on $100,000 of the profit (the amount over the half-million-dollar exclusion). Their health care tax on the sale would amount to $3,800 over and above the usual capital gains levy.
    FactCheck.org

However, a typical home sale in Las Vegas Valley would not incur the tax.  In March 2012 in the Las Vegas Valley, for example, the average sales prices as reported by b Forrest Barbee, Corporate Broker, Prudential, Americana Group, REALTORS®, were

  • REO . . . Ave Price – $132,635
  • Short Sales . . . Ave Price – $138,085
  • Classic Sales . . . Ave Price – $205,672

These would not generate a $250,000 profit, and so none would be subject to the tax.  All sellers should consult with a tax consultant of their choice.

Questions:  darren@dwelshlaw.com